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Q&A

Which Linux system to use?

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Usually, most of new user confuses which Linux should I use? After using some Distros they can't understand which I should use now. Which Linux is for Beginner, Intermediate and Professional?

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Well, what are your needs? It sounds like you've used a few distros before, so what do you think abou... (1 comment)

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Beginners should always start with a Linux that people around them are using. If they have friends using Red Hat, they should use Red Hat. If they have a local users' group with lots of Ubuntu users, they should use Ubuntu.

Local support is much more important than anything else when starting out with a new OS.

One stops being a beginner when one starts to experiment with other distributions, considering them on their own merits.

There are no "Advanced" Linux distributions, there are only general and specialized distributions.

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This is my basic approach as well, though I've always suggested finding a Linux mentor from the get-g... (1 comment)
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Beginner

Ubuntu/Lubuntu/Xubuntu

Lubuntu, Xubuntu is Ubuntu-based. Ubuntu is Debian-Based. All these are beginner friendly. Most of Developer uses Ubuntu, Lubuntu or Xubuntu. We’re pretty sure that Ubuntu needs no introduction if you’re a regular reader of Fossbytes. But why is Ubuntu such a tempting distro for beginners while other “Easy-to-use” distros are struggling to get user’s attention? That’s because Ubuntu has been in the Linux market for a long time and has become a lot popular. This Debian-based Linux distribution also enjoys the status of the most popular open-source operating system in the world.

Ubuntu's Source

  • Tons of free software in the Software Center
  • Vast Ubuntu community
  • Lots of flavors to suit your needs
  • Compatible with most hardware

Linux Mint

Linux Mint is also Ubuntu based.

  • Familiar user interface with Windows
  • Performs great with older hardware
  • Some improvements over Ubuntu

Linux Mint is very easy for Windows User. Linux Mint is arguably the best Ubuntu-based Linux distribution suitable for beginners. It is a fantastic Windows-Like Distribution. If you are new to Linux than, you can choose Linux Mint, Ubuntu, Xubuntu or Lubuntu blindly.

Intermediate

Solus

Solus offers an ideal desktop environment to developers, despite being a general-purpose Linux OS. It supports several advanced editors and integrated development versions such as Idea and GNOME Builders. It was previously known as Evolve OS. It is little bit harder. But, if you have some experience with Linux than, you can choose it. Very negligible amount of user uses Solus. So, most of time you won't get help from others. There's a question available in Solus discussion,"Why did you choose Solus".

An user said,

  1. Solus is rolling yet stable
  2. Budgie is gorgeous, sure it may not have the customization of plasma (which you can use on solus if you want) but it still facilitates everything I need
  3. Developers actually have a clear vision for what they want and stick to it which I feel a lot of distros could learn from. If you want a desktop, use a distro made for desktop (i.e. solus) if you want a server then you should use a distro made for servers (i.e. centOS or a BSD derivative). There is no reason for one distro to try and be everything.

I actually chose Solus for beautiful UI.

Fedora

Fedora has beautiful UI also. But, it is more easier than, Solus. Fedora offers three different versions, which include Workstation, Server, and IoT. Advanced users have an option to customize the operating system as per their needs.

  • Fedora CoreOS, an automatically-updating, minimal operating system for running containerized workloads securely and at scale.
  • Fedora Workstation for laptop and desktop computers, with a complete set of tools for developers.
  • Fedora Server for data centers.
  • Fedora IoT for IoT ecosystems.
  • Fedora Silverblue, an immutable desktop operating system aimed at good support for container-focused workflows

Debian

Everyone is familiar with the name. I had mentioned the name earlier also.

Before we begin, you must understand that Ubuntu is based off Debian, which itself is just another ‘flavor’ of Linux. Since Ubuntu shares much of its codebase with Debian, it is usually as fast, flexible and powerful as Debian. What Canonical – Ubuntu’s developer – basically does is add a bunch of extra features, a nicer interface (based on Unity, not GNOME – don’t worry if you don’t know what they are) and easier installation.

After trying some Linux Distros you can choose Debian. Debian helps to learn most of tools. Sometimes, you may be frustrated also. After installation of Debian you have to install Wireless Interface. Debian isn't for Beginner. Debian is one of the most stable and well-renowned operating systems offered by Linux. It forms a base for some other environments like Ubuntu, PureOS, SteamOS, Knoppix, Tails, and many more. This distribution is known for its easy and smooth upgrades, as it offers its updates within a set release cycle. Users can use a live CD to install this operating system, which includes an easy-to-use Calamares installer.

Advanced

Arch Linux

It is the worst Linux Distribution I have ever seen. It's too hard to install. You need lots of patience to understand Arch Linux. Arch is best for Programmer. But, I will never suggest to choose Arch Linux. If you want to move to Arch than, you need over than 1.5 years experience of Linux. Otherwise, you will just waste your time. You can't do anything. Arch Linux is known for its bleeding-edge technology. Users get early-bird access to beta software and other software that is pending release on other systems. If being a beta user/tester is your calling, you will love working on Arch. I couldn't use Arch. I was trying to install for two days. Although, I couldn't install. I just wasted my whole time. Youtube videos will be useless for installation of Arch (they helps very rarely). You must read installation guide very carefully.

Kali Linux

Kali isn't for everyone. Most of programmer chooses Kali Linux. After few moments, they move to another distro. Cause, Kali is for pen-testing. Some professional Linux user said,"if you want to use Kali Linux, than it's better to use it from USB rather than installing in PC." Kali is easy to install but, that doesn't mean it's easy to use. Some people says that Kali is too hard. No one will come to help you about Kali problems. Linux isn't hard but, Kali is. If you need to ask, then Kali Linux is not the right distribution for you.


In this answer, 50% context were taken from internet and other 50% is from my experience.

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Kali Linux is based on Ubuntu. (9 comments)

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