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Q&A Modern and practical way to schedule tasks on a Linux machine that is not always on

The standard way to schedule tasks in most Linux systems nowadays is to use systemd timers. This requires writing a systemd timer config file, which has syntax similar to INI. This is summarized i...

posted 4mo ago by matthewsnyder‭  ·  edited 4mo ago by matthewsnyder‭

Answer
#2: Post edited by user avatar matthewsnyder‭ · 2023-12-08T05:04:41Z (4 months ago)
  • The standard way to schedule tasks in most Linux systems nowadays is to use systemd timers.
  • This requires writing a systemd timer config file, which has syntax similar to INI. This is summarized in https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/Systemd/Timers and covered in detail in systemd docs.
  • The timers can be placed in various directories, notably one of these is under ~/.config which is convenient for versioning it as dotfiles.
  • The benefit of systemd timers is that they are currently ubiquitous, and systemd has powerful features for keeping track of logs and fine tuning the exact schedule. The drawback is that the timer configs end up being a bit complex, and systemd itself is complex and not that easy to use.
  • The standard way to schedule tasks in most Linux systems nowadays is to use systemd timers.
  • This requires writing a systemd timer config file, which has syntax similar to INI. This is summarized in https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/Systemd/Timers and covered in detail in systemd docs.
  • The timers can be placed in various directories, notably one of these is under `~/.config/systemd/user` which is convenient for versioning it as dotfiles. However, this is very limited, because it does not allow creating subfolder.
  • The benefit of systemd timers is that they are currently ubiquitous, and systemd has powerful features for keeping track of logs and fine tuning the exact schedule. The drawback is that the timer configs end up being a bit complex, and systemd itself is complex and not that easy to use.
#1: Initial revision by user avatar matthewsnyder‭ · 2023-12-07T19:23:02Z (4 months ago)
The standard way to schedule tasks in most Linux systems nowadays is to use systemd timers.

This requires writing a systemd timer config file, which has syntax similar to INI. This is summarized in https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/Systemd/Timers and covered in detail in systemd docs.

The timers can be placed in various directories, notably one of these is under ~/.config which is convenient for versioning it as dotfiles.

The benefit of systemd timers is that they are currently ubiquitous, and systemd has powerful features for keeping track of logs and fine tuning the exact schedule. The drawback is that the timer configs end up being a bit complex, and systemd itself is complex and not that easy to use.