Communities

Writing
Writing
Codidact Meta
Codidact Meta
The Great Outdoors
The Great Outdoors
Photography & Video
Photography & Video
Scientific Speculation
Scientific Speculation
Cooking
Cooking
Electrical Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Judaism
Judaism
Languages & Linguistics
Languages & Linguistics
Software Development
Software Development
Mathematics
Mathematics
Christianity
Christianity
Code Golf
Code Golf
Music
Music
Physics
Physics
Linux Systems
Linux Systems
Power Users
Power Users
Tabletop RPGs
Tabletop RPGs
Community Proposals
Community Proposals
tag:snake search within a tag
answers:0 unanswered questions
user:xxxx search by author id
score:0.5 posts with 0.5+ score
"snake oil" exact phrase
votes:4 posts with 4+ votes
created:<1w created < 1 week ago
post_type:xxxx type of post
Search help
Notifications
Mark all as read See all your notifications »
Q&A

Post History

75%
+4 −0
Q&A Does /proc/config.gz always contain all supported options of a kernel?

It is possible - while being unlikely - that /proc/config.gz does not match the actual kernel configuration. Normally, /proc/config.gz should reflect the kernel configuration truthfully. But wheth...

posted 3y ago by elgonzo‭  ·  edited 3y ago by elgonzo‭

Answer
#7: Post edited by user avatar elgonzo‭ · 2021-07-30T17:42:36Z (almost 3 years ago)
  • Yes, it is possible - while being unlikely - that /proc/config.gz does not match the actual kernel configuration.
  • Normally, /proc/config.gz should reflect the kernel configuration truthfully. But whether you can really rely on /proc/config.gz being truthful or not depends on the build process for the kernel (or in other words: where you got the kernel or its build files from).
  • In rare and extraordinary circumstances, a developer might decide to build a kernel with a certain configuration while letting /proc/config.gz pretend the kernel having a different configuration.
  • One such example case would be workarounds for compatibility issues, as is the case in this real-world project about a custom kernel for Xiaomi mido Android devices: https://github.com/franciscofranco/mido/commit/c9ea8d1f6bb5f9cd0c30053e98c2130b5a9499ab. To quote the message of the commit i linked to:
  • > Userspace reads /proc/config.gz and spits out an error message after boot
  • finishes when it doesn't like the kernel's configuration. In order to
  • preserve our freedom to customize the kernel however we'd like, show
  • userspace the stock config so that it never complains about our
  • kernel configuration.
  • It is possible - while being unlikely - that /proc/config.gz does not match the actual kernel configuration.
  • Normally, /proc/config.gz should reflect the kernel configuration truthfully. But whether you can really rely on /proc/config.gz being truthful or not depends on the build process for the kernel (or in other words: where you got the kernel or its build files from).
  • In rare and extraordinary circumstances, a developer might decide to build a kernel with a certain configuration while letting /proc/config.gz pretend the kernel having a different configuration.
  • One such example case would be workarounds for compatibility issues, as is the case in this real-world project about a custom kernel for Xiaomi mido Android devices: https://github.com/franciscofranco/mido/commit/c9ea8d1f6bb5f9cd0c30053e98c2130b5a9499ab. To quote the message of the commit i linked to:
  • > Userspace reads /proc/config.gz and spits out an error message after boot
  • finishes when it doesn't like the kernel's configuration. In order to
  • preserve our freedom to customize the kernel however we'd like, show
  • userspace the stock config so that it never complains about our
  • kernel configuration.
#6: Post edited by user avatar elgonzo‭ · 2021-07-30T13:58:02Z (almost 3 years ago)
  • Yes, it is possible - while being unlikely - that /proc/config.gz does not match the actual kernel configuration.
  • Normally, /proc/config.gz should reflect the kernel configuration truthfully. But whether you can really rely on /proc/config.gz being truthful or not depends on the build process for the kernel (or in other words: where you got the kernel or it's build files from).
  • In rare and extraordinary circumstances, a developer might decide to build a kernel with a certain configuration while letting /proc/config.gz pretend the kernel having a different configuration.
  • One such example case would be workarounds for compatibility issues, as is the case in this real-world project about a custom kernel for Xiaomi mido Android devices: https://github.com/franciscofranco/mido/commit/c9ea8d1f6bb5f9cd0c30053e98c2130b5a9499ab. To quote the message of the commit i linked to:
  • > Userspace reads /proc/config.gz and spits out an error message after boot
  • finishes when it doesn't like the kernel's configuration. In order to
  • preserve our freedom to customize the kernel however we'd like, show
  • userspace the stock config so that it never complains about our
  • kernel configuration.
  • Yes, it is possible - while being unlikely - that /proc/config.gz does not match the actual kernel configuration.
  • Normally, /proc/config.gz should reflect the kernel configuration truthfully. But whether you can really rely on /proc/config.gz being truthful or not depends on the build process for the kernel (or in other words: where you got the kernel or its build files from).
  • In rare and extraordinary circumstances, a developer might decide to build a kernel with a certain configuration while letting /proc/config.gz pretend the kernel having a different configuration.
  • One such example case would be workarounds for compatibility issues, as is the case in this real-world project about a custom kernel for Xiaomi mido Android devices: https://github.com/franciscofranco/mido/commit/c9ea8d1f6bb5f9cd0c30053e98c2130b5a9499ab. To quote the message of the commit i linked to:
  • > Userspace reads /proc/config.gz and spits out an error message after boot
  • finishes when it doesn't like the kernel's configuration. In order to
  • preserve our freedom to customize the kernel however we'd like, show
  • userspace the stock config so that it never complains about our
  • kernel configuration.
#5: Post edited by user avatar elgonzo‭ · 2021-07-30T13:57:32Z (almost 3 years ago)
  • Yes, it is possible - while being unlikely - that some options which the kernel supports do not appear in /proc/config.gz.
  • Normally, /proc/config.gz should reflect the kernel configuration. But whether you can really rely on /proc/config.gz being truthful or not depends on the build process for the kernel (or in other words: where you got the kernel or it's build files from).
  • In rare and extraordinary circumstances, a developer might decide to build a kernel with a certain configuration while letting /proc/config.gz pretend the kernel having a different configuration.
  • One such example case would be workarounds for compatibility issues, as is the case in this real-world project about a custom kernel for Xiaomi mido Android devices: https://github.com/franciscofranco/mido/commit/c9ea8d1f6bb5f9cd0c30053e98c2130b5a9499ab. To quote the message of the commit i linked to:
  • > Userspace reads /proc/config.gz and spits out an error message after boot
  • finishes when it doesn't like the kernel's configuration. In order to
  • preserve our freedom to customize the kernel however we'd like, show
  • userspace the stock config so that it never complains about our
  • kernel configuration.
  • Yes, it is possible - while being unlikely - that /proc/config.gz does not match the actual kernel configuration.
  • Normally, /proc/config.gz should reflect the kernel configuration truthfully. But whether you can really rely on /proc/config.gz being truthful or not depends on the build process for the kernel (or in other words: where you got the kernel or it's build files from).
  • In rare and extraordinary circumstances, a developer might decide to build a kernel with a certain configuration while letting /proc/config.gz pretend the kernel having a different configuration.
  • One such example case would be workarounds for compatibility issues, as is the case in this real-world project about a custom kernel for Xiaomi mido Android devices: https://github.com/franciscofranco/mido/commit/c9ea8d1f6bb5f9cd0c30053e98c2130b5a9499ab. To quote the message of the commit i linked to:
  • > Userspace reads /proc/config.gz and spits out an error message after boot
  • finishes when it doesn't like the kernel's configuration. In order to
  • preserve our freedom to customize the kernel however we'd like, show
  • userspace the stock config so that it never complains about our
  • kernel configuration.
#4: Post edited by user avatar elgonzo‭ · 2021-07-30T13:54:54Z (almost 3 years ago)
  • Yes, it is possible - while being unlikely - that some options which the kernel supports do not appear in /proc/config.gz.
  • Normally, /proc/config.gz should reflect the kernel configuration. But whether you can really rely on /proc/config.gz being truthful or not depends on the build process for the kernel (or in other words: where you got the kernel or it's build files from).
  • In rare and extraordinary circumstances, a developer might decide to build a kernel with a certain configuration while letting /proc/config.gz pretend the kernel having a different configuration.
  • One such an example case would be workarounds for compatibility issues, as is the case in this real-world project about a custom kernel for Xiaomi mido Android devices: https://github.com/franciscofranco/mido/commit/c9ea8d1f6bb5f9cd0c30053e98c2130b5a9499ab. To quote the message of the commit i linked to:
  • > Userspace reads /proc/config.gz and spits out an error message after boot
  • finishes when it doesn't like the kernel's configuration. In order to
  • preserve our freedom to customize the kernel however we'd like, show
  • userspace the stock config so that it never complains about our
  • kernel configuration.
  • Yes, it is possible - while being unlikely - that some options which the kernel supports do not appear in /proc/config.gz.
  • Normally, /proc/config.gz should reflect the kernel configuration. But whether you can really rely on /proc/config.gz being truthful or not depends on the build process for the kernel (or in other words: where you got the kernel or it's build files from).
  • In rare and extraordinary circumstances, a developer might decide to build a kernel with a certain configuration while letting /proc/config.gz pretend the kernel having a different configuration.
  • One such example case would be workarounds for compatibility issues, as is the case in this real-world project about a custom kernel for Xiaomi mido Android devices: https://github.com/franciscofranco/mido/commit/c9ea8d1f6bb5f9cd0c30053e98c2130b5a9499ab. To quote the message of the commit i linked to:
  • > Userspace reads /proc/config.gz and spits out an error message after boot
  • finishes when it doesn't like the kernel's configuration. In order to
  • preserve our freedom to customize the kernel however we'd like, show
  • userspace the stock config so that it never complains about our
  • kernel configuration.
#3: Post edited by user avatar elgonzo‭ · 2021-07-30T13:54:28Z (almost 3 years ago)
  • Yes, it is possible - while being unlikely - that some options which the kernel supports do not appear in /proc/config.gz.
  • Whether you can rely on it or not depends on the build process for the kernel (or in other words: where you got the kernel or it's build files from). Normally, /proc/config.gz should reflect the kernel configuration.
  • Normally... However, in rare and extraordinary circumstances, a developer might decide to build a kernel with a certain configuration while letting /proc/config.gz pretend the kernel having a different configuration.
  • One such an example case would be workarounds for compatibility issues, as is the case in this real-world project about a custom kernel for Xiaomi mido Android devices: https://github.com/franciscofranco/mido/commit/c9ea8d1f6bb5f9cd0c30053e98c2130b5a9499ab. To quote the message of the commit i linked to:
  • > Userspace reads /proc/config.gz and spits out an error message after boot
  • finishes when it doesn't like the kernel's configuration. In order to
  • preserve our freedom to customize the kernel however we'd like, show
  • userspace the stock config so that it never complains about our
  • kernel configuration.
  • Yes, it is possible - while being unlikely - that some options which the kernel supports do not appear in /proc/config.gz.
  • Normally, /proc/config.gz should reflect the kernel configuration. But whether you can really rely on /proc/config.gz being truthful or not depends on the build process for the kernel (or in other words: where you got the kernel or it's build files from).
  • In rare and extraordinary circumstances, a developer might decide to build a kernel with a certain configuration while letting /proc/config.gz pretend the kernel having a different configuration.
  • One such an example case would be workarounds for compatibility issues, as is the case in this real-world project about a custom kernel for Xiaomi mido Android devices: https://github.com/franciscofranco/mido/commit/c9ea8d1f6bb5f9cd0c30053e98c2130b5a9499ab. To quote the message of the commit i linked to:
  • > Userspace reads /proc/config.gz and spits out an error message after boot
  • finishes when it doesn't like the kernel's configuration. In order to
  • preserve our freedom to customize the kernel however we'd like, show
  • userspace the stock config so that it never complains about our
  • kernel configuration.
#2: Post edited by user avatar elgonzo‭ · 2021-07-30T13:53:10Z (almost 3 years ago)
  • Yes, it is possible - while being unlikely - that some options which the kernel supports do not appear /proc/config.gz.
  • Whether you can rely on it or not depends on the build process for the kernel (or in other words: where you got the kernel or it's build files from). Normally, /proc/config.gz should reflect the kernel configuration.
  • Normally... However, in rare and extraordinary circumstances, a developer might decide to build a kernel with a certain configuration while letting /proc/config.gz pretend the kernel having a different configuration.
  • One such an example case would be workarounds for compatibility issues, as is the case in this real-world project about a custom kernel for Xiaomi mido Android devices: https://github.com/franciscofranco/mido/commit/c9ea8d1f6bb5f9cd0c30053e98c2130b5a9499ab. To quote the message of the commit i linked to:
  • > Userspace reads /proc/config.gz and spits out an error message after boot
  • finishes when it doesn't like the kernel's configuration. In order to
  • preserve our freedom to customize the kernel however we'd like, show
  • userspace the stock config so that it never complains about our
  • kernel configuration.
  • Yes, it is possible - while being unlikely - that some options which the kernel supports do not appear in /proc/config.gz.
  • Whether you can rely on it or not depends on the build process for the kernel (or in other words: where you got the kernel or it's build files from). Normally, /proc/config.gz should reflect the kernel configuration.
  • Normally... However, in rare and extraordinary circumstances, a developer might decide to build a kernel with a certain configuration while letting /proc/config.gz pretend the kernel having a different configuration.
  • One such an example case would be workarounds for compatibility issues, as is the case in this real-world project about a custom kernel for Xiaomi mido Android devices: https://github.com/franciscofranco/mido/commit/c9ea8d1f6bb5f9cd0c30053e98c2130b5a9499ab. To quote the message of the commit i linked to:
  • > Userspace reads /proc/config.gz and spits out an error message after boot
  • finishes when it doesn't like the kernel's configuration. In order to
  • preserve our freedom to customize the kernel however we'd like, show
  • userspace the stock config so that it never complains about our
  • kernel configuration.
#1: Initial revision by user avatar elgonzo‭ · 2021-07-30T13:52:48Z (almost 3 years ago)
Yes, it is possible - while being unlikely - that some options which the kernel supports do not appear /proc/config.gz.

Whether you can rely on it or not depends on the build process for the kernel (or in other words: where you got the kernel or it's build files from). Normally, /proc/config.gz should reflect the kernel configuration.

Normally... However, in rare and extraordinary circumstances, a developer might decide to build a kernel with a certain configuration while letting /proc/config.gz pretend the kernel having a different configuration.

One such an example case would be workarounds for compatibility issues, as is the case in this real-world project about a custom kernel for Xiaomi mido Android devices: https://github.com/franciscofranco/mido/commit/c9ea8d1f6bb5f9cd0c30053e98c2130b5a9499ab. To quote the message of the commit i linked to:


 > Userspace reads /proc/config.gz and spits out an error message after boot
finishes when it doesn't like the kernel's configuration. In order to
preserve our freedom to customize the kernel however we'd like, show
userspace the stock config so that it never complains about our
kernel configuration.